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Resident entomologist Ron Whitehurst inspects a Lacewing Larvae Unit for larvae size and distribution at Rincon Vitova Insectaries in Ventura, Calif., on Wednesday, October 17, 2008.  ?They start out as an egg about 1/30th of an inch and are 5/8th inch when full grown,? explains Whitehurst.  Using syringe like pincers to inject digestive enzymes and liquefy their prey, the lacewing larvae ?can become effective predators for any soft bodied insects.? (Photo by Bryce Yukio Adolphson, © 2008)
Resident entomologist Ron Whitehurst inspects a Lacewing Larvae Unit for larvae size and distribution at Rincon Vitova Insectaries in Ventura, Calif., on Wednesday, October 17, 2008. ?They start out as an egg about 1/30th of an inch and are 5/8th inch when full grown,? explains Whitehurst. Using syringe like pincers to inject digestive enzymes and liquefy their prey, the lacewing larvae ?can become effective predators for any soft bodied insects.? (Photo by Bryce Yukio Adolphson, © 2008)
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